2020 – August

Doncaster Naturalists’ Society Excursion to Brodsworth Community Woodland

Restored/landscaped Colliery tip (SE5207) 26 August 2020, 10.30 to 14.30hrs.

Leader: Nora Boyle Members Present: Joyce & Paul (S); Jim (B); John (S); Anna (T); Carolyn (B) & Colin (H).

Dedication:
The late Albert Wright worked down Brodsworth Pit and lived in one of the ‘Model Village’ colliery houses that backed onto the Roman Ridge. He had been a member of the Doncaster Naturalists’ Society in the 1960s and 70s (and probably earlier) and was an active member of the YNU Ento. section. He would also have been delighted with the Brodsworth Community Woodland development.

Long ago on a DNS visit to the Roman Ridge we called in to see Albert and he showed us round his fascinating back garden. Whereas his proud neighbours would have prize Begonias or Chrysanths, the Wright garden was full of shrubs grown as food plants for Lepidoptera larvae. Colonies of munching larvae were protected from birds and insect parasites with linen bags … all flying like Buddhist prayer flags. The resultant high survival numbers of adults were ultimately released into the wild. In his flower beds he also had a number of boxes with inspection lids and access tubes which to our surprise and delight were occupied by bumble bee colonies.

Albert (very definitely an example of what the Victorians referred to as a ‘working man naturalist’) regularly corresponded with and supplied specimens to the legendary Miriam Rothschild for her Lepidoptera research.

Although not an academic, Peter Skidmore persuaded Albert to write up some of his activities for The Doncaster Naturalist. The following (some adorned with Dave Gagg cartoons) are available to read on the Doncaster Nats website –
Pupa Digging Vol.1 No.3 (1983):41-44.
Mostly about Bumble Bees Vol.1 No.4 (1984): 69-73.
Assembling Moths Vol.1 No.7 (1986):69-82.

Potted history: (largely according to Wikipedia)
Brodsworth Colliery was established in 1905 when two shafts were sunk between October 1905 and 1907 in a joint venture by the Hickleton Main Colliery Company and the Staveley Coal and Iron Company. The colliery exploited the coal seams of South Yorkshire including the Barnsley seam which was reached at a depth of 595 yards and was up to 9 feet thick. After a third shaft was sunk in 1923, Brodsworth, the largest colliery in Yorkshire, had the highest output of any three-shaft colliery in Britain.
In 1937 Brodsworth was merged with five other local collieries to form ‘Doncaster Amalgamated Collieries’. It was taken over by the National Coal Board in 1947 and finally closed in 1990
The colliery was consistently amongst those that employed the most miners in Britain, employing around 2,800 workers throughout the 1980s.
The original company built Woodlands, a model village, for its workers.
Since the colliery closed, its spoil tip has been restored and developed as community woodland; owned by the Land Restoration Trust and controlled by the Forestry Commission.
Some of the colliery site has been sufficiently remediated to allow houses to be built upon it. Currently work is proceeding on the 342 home Keepmoat Homes ‘Skylarks Grange’ development.

The Coral-necklace Illecebrum verticillatum Brodsworth’s botanical conundrum:
A population of this exceedingly rare plant was first noticed at Brodsworth on colliery waste between the railway tracks at the colliery sidings (SE528075 and 530075) in July 1987 by Ian Mcdonald of the Doncaster Naturalists’ Society. Ian worked for British Rail on railway signalling and track maintenance. He was therefore able to gain access to active industrial sites from which the rest of us were normally prohibited.

In 1988 Ian showed the site to Mrs Dorothy Bramley and in 1990 to CAH.

After the colliery closed in 1990, the railway sidings were removed and the site was ‘landscaped’. It is now part of the green and pleasant ‘Brodsworth Community Woodland’.

Sadly, despite notifying the ‘powers that be’ and the consultants ‘restoring’ the site, the Illicebrum area was bulldozed, commercially top-soiled and seeded and the plant hasn’t been seen since despite several searches.

Quite how the plant got to Brodsworth colliery is a puzzle and speculations have ranged from
a) being brought in on coal wagons shuttled around between the Kent coalfield, where it also occurs, and South Yorkshire and
b) being brought in the treads of the footwear of a flying picket’ from the Kent coalfield during the miner’s strike of 1984-85 or even 1972.

Although the Brodsworth site is on the crest of the calcareous Magnesian Limestone ridge, the actual substrate was colliery waste and was probably rather acidic … probably not unlike the ‘railway clinker’ at its site in West Cornwall.

This record was additional to Dr David Pearman’s meticulous paper on the history and distribution of Illecebrum in Britain (Watsonia 27:143-148 (2008) though its ‘dot’ appears in the maps of the New Atlas of the British and Irish Flora (Preston, CD., Pearman, DA., & Dines, TD. 2002).

Amenity Usage: During our four hour visit on 26 August, other amenity users included – Walkers (7 adults and 14 children); Dog walkers (13 + 12 dogs); Equestrians (2). [making a grand total of 8 Naturalists + 36 other people + 12 dogs & 2 horses].

Records were constantly noted along our circuitous route (all within SE5207). These have been aggregated into Table 1 (Zoology) and Table 2 (Botany).

Table 1: Zoological records from each of the recording areas (see above) along our route.

Species Notes
MAMELS  
Mole Hills
BIRDS  
Blackcap  
Carrion Crow  
Dunnock  
Robin  
Magpie  
House Martin  
Starling  
? Hobby  
Kestrel  
Buzzard  
Wood Pigeon  
Blackheaded Gull Overhead
Lesser Blackbacked Gulls Overhead
Mallard  
BUTTERFLIES All confirmed by PS.
Common Blue  
Small White  
Large White  
Speckled Wood  
Meadow Brown  
Gatekeeper  
Small Tortoise-shell  
MOTHS  
Silver Y  
DIPTERA  
Drone Fly Eristalis arbustorum Nectaring on Ragwort by pond.
Greenbottle Lucillia sp.  
COLEOPTERA  
2-spot Ladybird  
7-spot Ladybird  
Alder Leaf Beetle Agelastica alni. det RM. Formerly rare and thought to be extinct
in Britain from 1946.
Recently spread back to Britain and is proving
to be frequent on wetland alders around Doncaster.
Larvae and adults on A. glutinosa & A. incan.
HETEROPTERA  
Green Shieldbug Palomena prasina confirmed by PS.
Lucern Bug Adelphocoris lineolatus Photo sent to  Stewart Foster for confirmation
HYMENOPTERA  
Honey Bee Apis melifera  
Common Carder Bee confirmed by PS.
Buff-tailed Bumblebee confirmed by PS.
Bombus terrestris  
ODONATA  
Migrant Hawker Aeshna mixta confirmed by PS.
Common Darter Sympetrum striolatum confirmed by PS.
SPIDERS  
Dyctina arundinacea Retreats spun in the heads of  tall grasses.
Oenoplognatha ovata 6 yellow form and 1 red striped form.
6 defending egg cocoons on Bramble leaves and
1 on Oak leaf.
PLANT GALLS All determined by NB.
(Colt’s-foot)  
Rust fungus Puccinia poarum On Coltsfoot (Tussilago farfara)  leaves
 (Oaks)  
Gall wasp Silk Button Galls on leaves of Q. robur
Gall wasp Neuroterus quercus-baccarum Spangle Gall on Q. robur leaves.
(Dog Rose)  
Gall wasp Diplolepis rosae. Robin’s-pincushion gall on Dog rose.

Table 2: Flowering Plants & Ferns. List in alphabetical order of the botanical names
SE5207 recorded during the Nats visit & SE5206 recorded during a brief visit by CAH 30.08.2020

 

 

Botanical Name Vernacular Name SE5207 SE5206
Acer campstris Field Maple * *
Artemisia vulgaris Mugwort * *
Aster novi-belgii* Michaelmas-daisy, at least three forms encountered. * *
Bellis perennis Daisy * *
Betula pendula Silver Birch * *
Blackstonia perfoliata Yellow-wort * *
Brachypodium pinnatum Tor-grass *  
Buddleja davidii Butterfly-bush *  
Calystegia sepium Hedge Bindweed * *
Carex flacca Glaucous Sedge *  
Carex otrubae False Fox-sedge *  
Centaurea nigra Common Knapweed or Hardheads * *
Centaurea nigra var. Common Knapweed Long rayed form (det. John Scott) *  
Centaureum erythraea Common Centaury * *
Chamerion angustifolium Rosebay * *
Chenopodium album agg Fat Hen * *
Cichorium intybus Chicory *  
Cirsium arvense Creeping Thistle * *
Cirsium vulgaris Spear Thistle * *
Clemastis vitalba Traveller’s Joy *  
Convolvulus arvensis Field Bindweed * *
Cotoneaster sp. A cotoneaster *  
Cornus sanguinea Dogwood * *
Corylus avellana Hazel *  
Crataegus monogyna Hawthorn * *
Cynosurus cristatus Crested Dog’s-tail *  
Dactylis glomerata Cock’s-foot * *
Daucus carota Wild Carrot * *
Dipsacus fullonum Teasel * *
Dryopteris filix-mas Common Male Fern *  
Eliocharis palustris Common Spike-rush *  
Epilobium hirsutum Great Willowherb * *
Equisetum arvense Field Horsetail * *
Erigeron acer Blue Fleabane * *
Euphorbia helioscopia Sun Spurge *  
Festuca rubra sens.str. Red Fescue * *
Fraxinus excelsior Ash * *
Galium aparine Cleavers * *
Galium verum Lady’s Bedstraw *  
Geranium dissectum Cut-leaved Crane’s-bill * *
Geranium molle Dove’s-foot Cranesbill * *
Geranium pratense Meadow Crane’s-bill *  
Geranium robertianum Herb Robert * *
Heracleum sphondylium Hogweed * *
Hieracium sp. A hawkweed * *
Holcus lanatus Yorkshire-fog * *
Hypericum perforatum Perforate St John’s-wort * *
Inula conyza Ploughman’s Spikenard * *
Iris pseudacorus Yellow Flag Iris *  
Juncus inflexus Hard Rush * *
Knautia arvensis Field Scabious *  
Lamium album White Dead-nettle * *
Larix sp. Larch * *
Lathyrus pratensis Meadow Vetchling * *
Leontodon autumnalis Autumn Hawkbit * *
Leucanthemum vulgare Oxeye Daisy *  
Leucanthemum x superbum Shasta Daisy *  
Linaria vulgaris Common Toadflx *  
Linum catharticum Fairy Flax *  
Lolium perenne Perennial Rye-grass * *
Lotus corniculatus Bird’s-foot-trefoil * *
Lycopus europaeus Gipsywort *  
Lysimachia vulgaris Yellow Loosestrife *  
Lythrum salicaria Purple Loosestrife *  
Malus domesticus var. Apple * *
Medicago lupulina Black Medick * *
Medicago sative ssp. sativa Lucerne (Det. John Scott) * *
Melilotus officinalis Ribbed Melilot * *
Mentha spicata x suaveolens Apple-mint *  
Odontites verna Red Bartsia * *
Onobrychis viciifolia Sainfoin (Det. John Scott) * *
Ononis repens Common Restharrow * *
Phalaris arundinacea Reed Canary-grass *  
Phragmites australis Common Reed * *
Picris echioides Bristly Oxtongue * *
Plantago lanceolata Ribwort Plantain * *
Plantago major Rat-tail Plantain * *
Populus x canescens Grey Poplar *  
Potentilla reptans Creeping Cinquefoil * *
Prunella vulgaris Selfheal * *
Prunus spinosa Backthorn * *
Prunus avium. Wild Cherry * *
Pulicaria dysenterica Common Fleabane * *
Quercus cerris Turkey Oak * *
Quercus robur Pedunculate Oak * *
Ranunculus acris Meadow Buttercup * *
Ranunculus repens Creeping Buttercup * *
Rorippa nasturtium-aquaticum Water-cress  (Det. John Scott) *  
Rosa canina sens. str Dog Rose (Det. John Scott) * *
Rosa mollis Downy Rose  (Det. John Scott) *  
Rubus fruticosus agg. Bramble * *
Salix caprea Goat Willow * *
Salix cinerea ssp. cinerea A willow * *
Salix alba White Willow (hybrid) *  
Schoenoplectus lacustris Common Club-rush *  
Schoenoplectus tabernaemontani Grey Club-rush *  
Senecio erucifolius Hoary Ragwort * *
Senecio jacobaea Common Ragwort * *
Sambucus nigra Elder * *
Sonchus arvensis Perennial Sow-thistle * *
Sonchus asper Prickly Sow-thistle * *
Sonchus oleraceus Smooth Sow-thistle * *
Sorbus aucuparia Rowan * *
Sorbus intermedia sens str Swedish Whitebeam  (Det. John Scott) *  
Succisa pratensis Devil’s-bit Scabious *  
Tanacetum vulgare Tansey *  
Taraxacum officinale agg Dandelion * *
Torilis japonica Upright Hedge-parsley * *
Trifolium dubium Lesser Trefoil * *
Trifolium hybridum Alsike Clover (Det. John Scott) *  
TrIfolium pratense Red Clover * *
Trifolium repens White Clover * *
Tussilago farfara Colt’s-foot * *
Typha latifolia Reedmace * *
Ulex europaeus Gorse * *
Urtica dioica Nettle * *
Vicia cracca Tufted Vetch *  
Vicia sativa Common Vetch *  
Vicia tetrasperma Smooth Tare *  
Vinca minor Lesser Periwinkle *  

CAH

Doncaster Naturalists’ Society Excursion to Fen Carr

YWT Nature Reserve (SE6515) 12 August 2020.

Hedgerow Survey

Background: The lowland Humberhead parishes situated to the east of the A19 Doncaster/Selby road and sandwiched between the lower reaches of the River Went and the tidal Don are noteworthy for their ‘fossil’ landscape of green lanes, wet ditches field ponds and patchwork of tiny, thickly hedged often corrugated ‘ridge and furrow’ fields, many managed as pasture and species-rich hay meadows. The adjacent parishes of Fishlake and Sykehouse probably remain the best survivals of this extremely rare form of lowland rural landscape anywhere in the Yorkshire and Humber region.

Despite being in a remarkably well hedged and species-rich region, in the early 2000s the hedgerows of Fen Carr in the parish of Fishlake were evidently showing some deterioration. In August 2004 a survey report contained the following comments –

“A species poor defunct hedge with various standards throughout …The hedge is principally dominated by hawthorn and is in poor condition with many breaks in its continuity.”

However, the same report also beneficially mentioned the presence of oaks and ash in excess of 100 years old with rot and woodpecker holes.

Since the site’s acquisition by the YWT the hedgerows have evidently benefitted from conservation management such as planting up gaps with young shrubs protected by tree guards and the installation of fencing to prevent stock from eating out young growth from the hedge bottom. There have also been efforts to thicken lengths of boundary by hedge-laying. These measures have worked well and the hedges have improved considerably.

Methods: Using a Highways Engineer Surveying Wheel the seven boundary hedgerows of the two fields were divided into 30m survey samples (gateways and access gaps were not included). These were surveyed by counting in each measured sample
a) the species* of woody trees, shrubs and climbers and
b) the species of non-woody shrubs and climbers.
The results are shown in Tables 1 to 7 and reviewed in Figures 1 and 2.

*To simplify the exercise, all roses (although Rosa arvensis and R. obtusifolia had been identified) were regarded as one taxa (Rosa spp.) and all shrub-forming sallows (although Salix cinerea and S. caprea had been identified) were also regarded as one taxa (Salix spp.).

Results: The 41 x 30m hedgerow samples revealed 12 woody tree and shrub taxa as follows, Apple, Ash, Blackthorn, Elder, Field Maple, Hawthorn, Hazel, Pedunculate Oak , Sallows and White Willow and two woody climbers, Bramble and Rose spp., their relative frequencies are shown in Figure 1.

There were also 4 non-woody shrubs and climbers as follows, Black Bryony (3 samples), Honeysuckle (1 sample), Spurge Laurel (3 samples) and Woody Nightshade (1 sample).

Figure 1: % frequency of taxa of woody trees, shrubs and climbers in 41 x 30m hedgerow samples.
[Click on image to expand]

Species frequency per 30m sample ranged from 3 to 8, the most frequent being 5 and the mean for the whole site being 5.21. The Eastern hedge had a mean frequency per sample of 5.36, the central hedge 5.18 and the western hedge 4.91.

Figure 2: Numbers of taxa of woody trees, shrubs and climbers in 41 30m hedgerow samples.
[Click on image to expand]

Discussion and Comments:
(Species frequency) The 1982 survey of 678 hedgerows throughout the parish of Fishlake (unpublished manuscript in Doncaster Museum) showed species frequencies ranging from 1 to 8 with a mean frequency of 2.86 per sample (see table A).

Since Hooper’s rule asserts that the number of woody species in a hedge can be a function of its age, with an average of one additional species recruited per century. For a landscape largely set out in 1825 the mean species frequency of 2.86 per 30m sample would be about right, the higher frequencies occurring in much older pre enclosure hedgerows such as along older highways and parish boundaries.

Why the mean species frequency at Fen Carr should be so much higher (at 5.21) than the parish average is a puzzle though the site abuts onto the Fishlake/Sykehouse parish boundary and the local occurrence of ancient place-names (Fen, Carr and Hague) suggests evidence of its being part of a much older landscape.

(Species comments)
Apple. Although wild crab apple had been expected to occur, in fact the three Malus samples were identified as cultivated M domesticus. An examination of large scale pre-war Ordnance Survey sheets for the Fishlake region reveals a number of orchards associated with local settlements and farmsteads. Fruit was extensively grown indeed one named apple variety, the ‘Sykehouse Russet’ originated locally (see YNU Bulletin (2004) 42: 18-21)). It is likely that the Fen Carr apples grew from the discarded cores of apples from the ‘snap tins’ of agricultural workers working (? hedging and ditching) on site.

Blackthorn. is a prominent component of local hedgerows, producing a bumper crop of sloes in 2020 as witnessed during our survey. Its distribution, however, varied considerably occurring in over 99% of samples in both eastern and central hedgerows but dropping to 16% in the wetter western hedge. Since Blackthorn was making significant encroachment, particularly into the eastern meadow, this needs to be controlled by mowing in future years.

White Willows. Though statistically insignificant, occurring in only 7.3% of samples, the Fen Carr White Willows, like cathedral spires, form magnificent and iconic landscape features. Formerly a major feature of the local parishes, sadly these are being lost from the landscape. Once regularly pollarded for timber products, this is no longer the case; most that are left are reaching senescence, collapsing and being removed for safety or for agricultural convenience. It has been suggested that promoting coppice timber as a carbon neutral fuel may provide a commercial future for the local white willow stock.

Spurge Laurel. is better known as an understory species of limestone woodlands such as those at Wadworth Woods and in the Don Gorge. In the Fishlake and Sykehouse parishes it is a curiosity occurring uncommonly under the canopies of Parish boundary and Green Lane hedges. At Fenn Carr, plants occur in each of the southern hedges facing Carr Head Lane and an adjacent section of the eastern boundary hedge. In high summer it was only possible to count five separate plants but a winter survey of these and hedgerows and adjacent green lane networks would be useful to determine the size and distribution of this curious population.

Table 1: Fen Carr Hedges. East hedge [30m samples south (1) to north (11)].

Botanical Name Vernacular Name 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 . % occ. in 11 samples
(Woody Shrubs, Trees & Climbers}                            
Acer campestre Field Maple * * *               * 4 36.36%
Crataegus monogyna Hawthorn * * *   * *   * * * * 9 81.81%
Fraxinus excelsior Ash * * *       *         4 36.36%
Malus domesticus Apple      *                 1 9.09%
Prunus spinosa Blackthorn * * * * * * * * * *   10 90.90%
Quercus robur Pedunculate Oak   * * *   * * * * * * 9 81.81%
Rosa spp. Rose spp. * * *   *   * * * * * 9 81.81%
Rubus fruticosus agg. Bramble * * * * * * * * * * * 11 100%
Salix alba White Willow         *             1 9.09%
Sambucus nigra Elder *                     1 9.09%
Number per 30m sample   7 7 7 4 5 4 5 5 5 5 5 Mean 5.36  
(non-woody Climbers etc.}                            
Daphne laureala Spurge Laurel *                        
Tamus communis Black Bryony *                        

Table 2: Fen Carr Hedges. Central hedge [30m samples south (1) to north (11)].

Botanical Name Vernacular Name 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 . % occ. in 11 samples
(Woody Shrubs, Trees & Climbers}                            
Acer campestre Field Maple *                     1 9.09%
Corylus avellana Hazel         *             1 9.09%
Crataegus monogyna Hawthorn * * * * * * * * *   * 10 99.9%
Malus domesticus Apple * * *                 2 18.18%
Prunus spinosa Blackthorn * * * * *   * * * * * 10 90.9%
Quercus robur Pedunculate Oak   * * * * * * * * * * 11 100%
Rosa spp. Rose spp. * *     * * *     * * 7 63.63%
Rubus fruticosus agg. Bramble * * * * * *   * * * * 10 99.9%
Salix alba White Willow               * *     2 18.18%
Salix spp. Elder         * * *         3 27.27%
Number per 30m sample   7 6 4 4 7 5 5 5 5 4 5 Mean 5.18  
(non-woody Climbers etc.}                            
Solanum dulcamara Woody Nightshade         *                
.                            

Table 3: Fen Carr Hedges. Western hedge [30m samples south (1) to north (11)].

Botanical Name Vernacular Name 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 . % occ. in 12 samples
(Woody Shrubs, Trees & Climbers}                              
Acer campestre Field Maple *         * *     *   * 5 41.66%
Crataegus monogyna Hawthorn *         * * * *       5 41.66%
Sambucus niger Elder             *           1 8.33%
Prunus spinosa Blackthorn             *       *   2 16.66%
Quercus robur Pedunculate Oak * * * * * * * * * * * * 12 100%
Rosa spp. Rose spp. * * * *     * * * * * * 10 88.33%
Rubus fruticosus agg. Bramble * * * * * * * * * * * * 12 100%
Salix spp. Sallow * * * * * * * * * * * * 12 100%
                               
Number of taxa per 30m sample   6 4 4 4 3 5 8 5 5 5 5 5 Mean 4.91  
(non-woody Climbers etc.}                              
                               
.                              

Table 4: Fen Carr Hedges. South (East).

Botanical Name Vernacular Name East of gate (18m) West of gate (24m)
(Woody Shrubs, Trees & Climbers}      
Acer campestre Field Maple * *
Crataegus monogyna Hawthorn *  
Fraxinus excelsior Ash * *
Quercus robur Pedunculate Oak * *
Rosa spp. Rose spp. * *
Rubus fruticosus agg. Bramble * *
Number per sample   6 5
(non-woody Climbers etc.}      
Daphne laureola Spurge Laurel   *
Lonicera periclymenum Honeysuckle   *
Tamus communis Black Bryony   *

Table 5: Fen Carr Hedges. South (West).

Botanical Name Vernacular Name East of gate (30m) West of gate (30m)
(Woody Shrubs, Trees & Climbers}      
Acer campestre Field Maple * *
Crataegus monogyna Hawthorn * *
Fraxinus excelsior Ash * *
Quercus robur Pedunculate Oak   *
Rosa spp. Rose spp. * *
Rubus fruticosus agg. Bramble * *
Prunus spinosa Blackthorn *  
Number per sample   6 6
(non-woody Climbers etc.}      
Daphne laureola Spurge Laurel   *
Tamus communis Black Bryony   *

Table 6: Fen Carr Hedges. North (east).

Botanical Name Vernacular Name 30m .
(Woody Shrubs, Trees & Climbers}      
Acer campestre Field Maple *  
Crataegus monogyna Hawthorn *  
Rosa spp. Rose spp.    
Rubus fruticosus agg. Bramble *  
Salix Sallow *  
Number per 30m sample   6  

Table 7: Fen Carr Hedges. North (west).

Botanical Name Vernacular Name 1 2 .
(Woody Shrubs, Trees & Climbers}        
Crataegus monogyna Hawthorn * *  
Rosa spp. Rose spp. * *  
Rubus fruticosus agg. Bramble * *  
Malus domesticus Apple * *  
Prunus spinosa Blackthorn * *  
Sambucus nigra Elder * *  
Number per 30m sample   6 6  

Additional Notes:
A fruiting shrub of Purging Buckthorn Rhamnus catharticus was present adjacent to Fen Carr in the northern hedgerow of Carr Head Lane.

For further local context I attach the results of a hedgerow survey made by CAH on 10 July 2010 from two sets of nine and eleven 30m samples from along the south side of Carr Head Lane

Nine 30m headgerow samples (east to west on left [south] side of lane). Geesness Lane to junction with Fosterhouses Green Lane (10/07/2010).

Carr Head Lane – A  
Trees / Shrubs strong> 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Ash * * * * * * * * *
Blackthorn *           * *  
Field Maple * * * * * * * * *
Hawthorn * * * * * * * * *
Oak   * * * * * * * *
Sallow (Grey)   *   * * * *    
Willow (White)                 *
Woody Climbers                  
Bramble * * * * * * * *  
Rose (Dog) * *              
Rose (Field)   *       * * *  
  6 8 5 6 6 7 8 7 5

Eleven 30m hedgerow samples (east to west on left [south] side of lane). Fosterhouses Green Lane to junction with Tideworth Hague Gorse Lane (10/07/2010).

 

Carr Head Lane – B .
Trees / Shrubs 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Ash *     * * *          
Blackthorn   * *   * * *        
Field Maple * * * * * * * * * * *
Hawthorn * * * * * * * * * * *
Oak   *   *   * *     *  
Willow (White) *                    
Woody Climbers                      
Bramble * * * *   *   * *   *
Rose (Dog)           *       *  
Rose (Field)     * *         *    
  5 5 5 6 4 7 4 3 4 4 3
Non-woody Climbers [under reported]                      
Black Bryony  *                    

CAH


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